Know the law

Each family who decides to homeschool is responsible to know the homeschool law. The law is not difficult, but if you don't follow it, your child could be considered truant and you would be in violation of the compulsory attendance law. OCEANetwork believes that the parent, not government, has the responsibility to educate children. Until such time as the homeschool law is repealed, however, we encourage families to honor the civil authority and obey the law.

"Summary of homeschool law"

"Children between the ages of 7 and 18 are required to attend public school unless they qualify for an exemption. If you comply with the homeschool procedures, your child is exempt from having to attend public school."

In order to obtain the homeschool exemption you must:
  1. Notify the Educational Service District (ESD) of your intent to homeschool. The letter must contain your name and address, names and birthdates of the children you are homeschooling and the name of the last public school your child attended or the school district in which you reside. You just send in this letter once for each child. If you move to another ESD, you need to notify the new ESD.
  2. Homeschool students are evaluated in grades 3, 5, 8 and 10. Most students are evaluated with standardized achievement tests. Special needs students have alternate methods of evaluation. The ESD may request you to send a copy of the evaluation results to them for their files. (Make sure you read the Oregon Homeschool Laws brochure to find the list of tests, who can give the test, etc.)
  3. If your homeschool student scores above the 15th percentile, you are free to continue home educating. If your child falls below the 15th percentile, the law contains a three-year procedure to attempt to bring the child's scores above the 15th percentile.
We have written a brochure containing the homeschool laws and their explanation in English. It is important for every homeschool family to completely understand the homeschool law.
Part 1: Understanding the homeschool law.
Part 2: Understanding the homeschool law for students with special needs.
Part 3: Participating in Interscholastic Activities
Part 4: Additional things to consider.
Part 5: Statutes and Rules for homeschooling

PDF Brochure: Oregon Homeschool Laws - (12 pages)

Oregon Department of Education publications (best viewed in Internet Explorer and Adobe Acrobat 5.0 or higher):
The Oregon Department of Education's web page for homeschooling.
Contact information for Educational Service Districts - Excel Spread Sheet
Current list of test administrators (Scroll to the bottom of the Oregon Department of Education's page for the current list of test administrators.)

OCEANetwork published articles:
Homeschool High School

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